Images of America: The 1984 New Orleans World's Fair

Book Description: In 1984, the city of New Orleans hosted the last world’s fair held in the United States. Conceived as part of an ambitious effort to revitalize a dilapidated section of the city and establish New Orleans as a year-round tourist destination, it took more than 12 years of political intrigue and design changes before the gates finally opened. Stretching 84 acres along the Mississippi River, the fair entertained more than seven million guests with a colorful collection of pavilions, rides, and restaurants during its six-month run. While most world’s fairs lose money, the 1984 New Orleans World’s Fair had the dubious distinction of going bankrupt and almost closing early. However, the $350-million investment did succeed in bringing new life to the area, which is now home to the city’s convention center and a bustling arts district.

Author Bio: Author Bill Cotter is a longtime fan of world’s fairs, an interest that started with his first visit to the 1964–1965 New York World’s Fair. He has been fortunate enough to attend several fairs around the world and capture these fleeting experiences on film. His early days at the 1964 fair started him on a career that includes working with the Walt Disney Company, Warner Brothers, and Universal Studios.

PUBLISHED BY ARCADIA
$21.99

200+ photos, 128 pages

The book is $19.80 (10% off) plus $7.15 for Priority Mail shipping. International buyers should write for air mail rates as they vary by location.

Please let me know if you would like the book signed in any special way, just signed, or left unsigned.

Checks or money orders can be sent to:

Bill Cotter
17242 Van Gogh Street
Granada Hills, CA 91344

You can also order through PayPal through this link:

Orders for the book can also be combined with orders for my CDs of photos from the Fair or the Postcards of America set. There's just one shipping charge of $7.15 for any US order of books and CDs.

If you have any questions please click here to send me an e-mail.

Bill Cotter
December 5, 2015