The 1964-1965 New York World's Fair

Fiesta (1965)

People-to-People presents the world in microcosm. Africa, Asia, Europe, as well as the Americas, are represented in a "village" of kiosks which display and sell a variety of folk art. Admission is charged; proceeds go to a center for world understanding.

Fiesta sign

The "People to People Fiesta International Market", more commonly known as just Fiesta, was an addition for the 1965 season. Here's how a press release described it: This entirely new exhibit, in the heart of the industrial area, will feature five major complexes, United States, Africa, Asia, Latin America and Europe, which will house handicrafts and artifacts. A sixth complex, managed and operated by Restaurant Associates, will prepare and serve foods of an international character. (CD #35 Set 179 #5)



Fiesta site in 1964

Fiesta was added in an unused plot of land between the IBM and Festival of Gas pavilions. Seen here in 1964, the site had originally been announced as the home of "Argus Photo Fun Land", but after that venture collapsed the area was left as a large lawn with curving walkways when the Fair opened. (CD #65 Set 263 #4)



Fiesta site

The 1965 season saw the lawn area replaced with a sea of asphalt. Fiesta was originally intended to cover the complete area, but it was eventually down-sized and a crude wooden wall erected to separate it from the rather barren area behind it.

Fiesta was not much of a hit due to the fact that an admission fee was charged. Once inside there was little more than shops and food stands, without any real entertainment, so guests were basically being charged a fee to be able to spend more money. It was unlikely that anyone would pay for a return visit or recommend it to their friends. There was one clever element though to the admission fee; children who could fit through a junior-sized door were let in for free.

The admission fee was later dropped but it was too late to make Fiesta a success. (CD #51 Set 30 #7)



Want more information on Fiesta?

Souvenir brochure


Industrial Area pavilions