The 1964-1965 New York World's Fair

Montana

"The Big Sky Country" mounts an exhibit full of the fire and spirit of the Western frontier. At the heart of the exhibit are seven railroad cars, parked on a rail siding and painted on the outside with 16-foot murals of Western scenes by Montana artist Lyman A. Rice. Three of the cars house a museum, another displays a collection of cattle brands, and the remainder contain shops. Also on the grounds are two corrals, two log forts and some Indians.

Exterior

The rustic wooden structures of the Montana pavilion were a striking contrast to the many futuristic structures spread across the Fair. (CD #24 Set 132 #3A)



Train cars

Museum on Wheels. Mounted examples of Montana fish and wildlife are on display, along with paintings and sculpture by two leading Western painters, Charles M. Russell and Frederic Remington, among others. There are exhibits from Montana's state and national parks, and a million dollars in gold nuggets and dust is piled up casually, making a heap only a cubic foot in size. Also on display are 14 cases from the Don Foote collection of mementos of Western personalities: guns, saddles, bridles once used by Wild Bill Hickok, General George Armstrong Custer and Buffalo Bill Cody.

Montana was a very long and thin pavilion due to the use of the train cars. (CD #10 Set 50 #4)



Stuffed buffalo

The Corrals. One of the two corrals contains a stuffed pinto horse in a bucking position - which people may mount to have their pictures taken - and a mechanical buffalo that can be driven about. The other displays various breeds of livestock raised in Montana. (CD #10 Set 50 #24)



Dancer

Dancing and Music. The Indians encamped at the exhibit give several shows daily of tribal dancing. In the arcade at the second of the forts are nickelodeons and other antique music-making machines, all in working condition and ready for playing. (CD #23 Set 123 #20)



Want more information on the Montana pavilion?

Montana Centennial Train and World's Fair Exhibit


Federal and State Area pavilions